com.avaje.ebean
Interface Query<T>

Type Parameters:
T - the type of Entity bean this query will fetch.
All Superinterfaces:
Serializable

public interface Query<T>
extends Serializable

    

Object relational query for finding a List, Set, Map or single entity bean.

Example: Create the query using the API.

 List<Order> orderList = 
   Ebean.find(Order.class)
     .fetch("customer")
     .fetch("details")
     .where()
       .like("customer.name","rob%")
       .gt("orderDate",lastWeek)
     .orderBy("customer.id, id desc")
     .setMaxRows(50)
     .findList();
   
 ...
 

Example: The same query using the query language

 String oql = 
        "  find  order "
        +" fetch customer "
        +" fetch details "
        +" where customer.name like :custName and orderDate > :minOrderDate "
        +" order by customer.id, id desc "
        +" limit 50 ";
   
 Query<Order> query = Ebean.createQuery(Order.class, oql);
 query.setParameter("custName", "Rob%");
 query.setParameter("minOrderDate", lastWeek);
   
 List<Order> orderList = query.findList();
 ...
 

Example: Using a named query called "with.cust.and.details"

 Query<Order> query = Ebean.createNamedQuery(Order.class,"with.cust.and.details");
 query.setParameter("custName", "Rob%");
 query.setParameter("minOrderDate", lastWeek);
   
 List<Order> orderList = query.findList();
 ...
 

Autofetch

Ebean has built in support for "Autofetch". This is a mechanism where a query can be automatically tuned based on profiling information that is collected.

This is effectively the same as automatically using select() and fetch() to build a query that will fetch all the data required by the application and no more.

It is expected that Autofetch will be the default approach for many queries in a system. It is possibly not as useful where the result of a query is sent to a remote client or where there is some requirement for "Read Consistency" guarantees.

Query Language

Partial Objects

The find and fetch clauses support specifying a list of properties to fetch. This results in objects that are "partially populated". If you try to get a property that was not populated a "lazy loading" query will automatically fire and load the rest of the properties of the bean (This is very similar behaviour as a reference object being "lazy loaded").

Partial objects can be saved just like fully populated objects. If you do this you should remember to include the "Version" property in the initial fetch. If you do not include a version property then optimistic concurrency checking will occur but only include the fetched properties. Refer to "ALL Properties/Columns" mode of Optimistic Concurrency checking.

 [ find  {bean type} [ ( * | {fetch properties} ) ] ]
 [ fetch {associated bean} [ ( * | {fetch properties} ) ] ]
 [ where {predicates} ]
 [ order by {order by properties} ]
 [ limit {max rows} [ offset {first row} ] ]
 

FIND {bean type} [ ( * | {fetch properties} ) ]

With the find you specify the type of beans to fetch. You can optionally specify a list of properties to fetch. If you do not specify a list of properties ALL the properties for those beans are fetched.

In object graph terms the find clause specifies the type of bean at the root level and the fetch clauses specify the paths of the object graph to populate.

FETCH {associated property} [ ( * | {fetch properties} ) ]

With the fetch you specify the associated property to fetch and populate. The associated property is a OneToOnem, ManyToOne, OneToMany or ManyToMany property. When the query is executed Ebean will fetch the associated data.

For fetch of a path we can optionally specify a list of properties to fetch. If you do not specify a list of properties ALL the properties for that bean type are fetched.

WHERE {list of predicates}

The list of predicates which are joined by AND OR NOT ( and ). They can include named (or positioned) bind parameters. These parameters will need to be bound by setParameter(String, Object).

ORDER BY {order by properties}

The list of properties to order the result. You can include ASC (ascending) and DESC (descending) in the order by clause.

LIMIT {max rows} [ OFFSET {first row} ]

The limit offset specifies the max rows and first row to fetch. The offset is optional.

Examples of Ebean's Query Language

Find orders fetching all its properties

 find order
 

Find orders fetching all its properties

 find order (*)
 

Find orders fetching its id, shipDate and status properties. Note that the id property is always fetched even if it is not included in the list of fetch properties.

 find order (shipDate, status)
 

Find orders with a named bind variable (that will need to be bound via setParameter(String, Object)).

 find order
 where customer.name like :custLike
 

Find orders and also fetch the customer with a named bind parameter. This will fetch and populate both the order and customer objects.

 find  order
 fetch customer
 where customer.id = :custId
 

Find orders and also fetch the customer, customer shippingAddress, order details and related product. Note that customer and product objects will be "Partial Objects" with only some of their properties populated. The customer objects will have their id, name and shipping address populated. The product objects (associated with each order detail) will have their id, sku and name populated.

 find  order
 fetch customer (name)
 fetch customer.shippingAddress
 fetch details
 fetch details.product (sku, name)
 

Early parsing of the Query

When you get a Query object from a named query, the query statement has already been parsed. You can then add to that query (add fetch paths, add to the where clause) or override some of its settings (override the order by clause, first rows, max rows).

The thought is that you can use named queries as a 'starting point' and then modify the query to suit specific needs.

Building the Where clause

You can add to the where clause using Expression objects or a simple String. Note that the ExpressionList has methods to add most of the common expressions that you will need.

The full WHERE clause is constructed by appending together

The above is the order that these are clauses are appended to give the full WHERE clause.

Design Goal

This query language is NOT designed to be a replacement for SQL. It is designed to be a simple way to describe the "Object Graph" you want Ebean to build for you. Each find/fetch represents a node in that "Object Graph" which makes it easy to define for each node which properties you want to fetch.

Once you hit the limits of this language such as wanting aggregate functions (sum, average, min etc) or recursive queries etc you use SQL. Ebean's goal is to make it as easy as possible to use your own SQL to populate entity beans. Refer to RawSql .


Nested Class Summary
static class Query.Type
          The type of query result.
 
Method Summary
 void cancel()
          Cancel the query execution if supported by the underlying database and driver.
 Query<T> fetch(String path)
          Specify a path to load including all its properties.
 Query<T> fetch(String path, FetchConfig joinConfig)
          Additionally specify a JoinConfig to specify a "query join" and or define the lazy loading query.
 Query<T> fetch(String path, String fetchProperties)
          Specify a path to fetch with its specific properties to include (aka partial object).
 Query<T> fetch(String assocProperty, String fetchProperties, FetchConfig fetchConfig)
          Additionally specify a FetchConfig to use a separate query or lazy loading to load this path.
 ExpressionList<T> filterMany(String propertyName)
          This applies a filter on the 'many' property list rather than the root level objects.
 FutureIds<T> findFutureIds()
          Execute find Id's query in a background thread.
 FutureList<T> findFutureList()
          Execute find list query in a background thread.
 FutureRowCount<T> findFutureRowCount()
          Execute find row count query in a background thread.
 List<Object> findIds()
          Execute the query returning the list of Id's.
 List<T> findList()
          Execute the query returning the list of objects.
 Map<?,T> findMap()
          Execute the query returning a map of the objects.
 PagingList<T> findPagingList(int pageSize)
          Return a PagingList for this query.
 int findRowCount()
          Return the count of entities this query should return.
 Set<T> findSet()
          Execute the query returning the set of objects.
 T findUnique()
          Execute the query returning either a single bean or null (if no matching bean is found).
 ExpressionFactory getExpressionFactory()
          Return the ExpressionFactory used by this query.
 int getFirstRow()
          Return the first row value.
 String getGeneratedSql()
          Return the sql that was generated for executing this query.
 int getMaxRows()
          Return the max rows for this query.
 RawSql getRawSql()
          Return the RawSql that was set to use for this query.
 Query.Type getType()
          Return the type of query (List, Set, Map, Bean, rowCount etc).
 ExpressionList<T> having()
          Add Expressions to the Having clause return the ExpressionList.
 Query<T> having(Expression addExpressionToHaving)
          Add an expression to the having clause returning the query.
 Query<T> having(String addToHavingClause)
          Add additional clause(s) to the having clause.
 boolean isAutofetchTuned()
          Returns true if this query was tuned by autoFetch.
 Query<T> join(String path)
          Same as fetch(String)
 Query<T> join(String path, JoinConfig joinConfig)
          Same as fetch(String, FetchConfig)
 Query<T> join(String assocProperty, String fetchProperties)
          Same as fetch(String, String).
 Query<T> join(String assocProperty, String fetchProperties, JoinConfig joinConfig)
          Additionally specify a JoinConfig to specify a "query join" and or define the lazy loading query.
 OrderBy<T> order()
          Return the OrderBy so that you can append an ascending or descending property to the order by clause.
 Query<T> order(String orderByClause)
          Set the order by clause replacing the existing order by clause if there is one.
 OrderBy<T> orderBy()
          Return the OrderBy so that you can append an ascending or descending property to the order by clause.
 Query<T> orderBy(String orderByClause)
          Set the order by clause replacing the existing order by clause if there is one.
 Query<T> select(String fetchProperties)
          Explicitly set a comma delimited list of the properties to fetch on the 'main' entity bean (aka partial object).
 Query<T> setAutofetch(boolean autofetch)
          Explicitly specify whether to use Autofetch for this query.
 Query<T> setBackgroundFetchAfter(int backgroundFetchAfter)
          Set the rows after which fetching should continue in a background thread.
 Query<T> setBufferFetchSizeHint(int fetchSize)
          A hint which for JDBC translates to the Statement.fetchSize().
 Query<T> setDistinct(boolean isDistinct)
          Set whether this query uses DISTINCT.
 Query<T> setFirstRow(int firstRow)
          Set the first row to return for this query.
 Query<T> setId(Object id)
          Set the Id value to query.
 Query<T> setListener(QueryListener<T> queryListener)
          Set a listener to process the query on a row by row basis.
 Query<T> setLoadBeanCache(boolean loadBeanCache)
          When set to true all the beans from this query are loaded into the bean cache.
 Query<T> setMapKey(String mapKey)
          Set the property to use as keys for a map.
 Query<T> setMaxRows(int maxRows)
          Set the maximum number of rows to return in the query.
 Query<T> setOrder(OrderBy<T> orderBy)
          Set an OrderBy object to replace any existing OrderBy clause.
 Query<T> setOrderBy(OrderBy<T> orderBy)
          Set an OrderBy object to replace any existing OrderBy clause.
 Query<T> setParameter(int position, Object value)
          Set an ordered bind parameter according to its position.
 Query<T> setParameter(String name, Object value)
          Set a named bind parameter.
 Query<T> setQuery(String oql)
          Deprecated.  
 Query<T> setRawSql(RawSql rawSql)
          Set RawSql to use for this query.
 Query<T> setReadOnly(boolean readOnly)
          When set to true when you want the returned beans to be read only.
 Query<T> setTimeout(int secs)
          Set a timeout on this query.
 Query<T> setUseCache(boolean useBeanCache)
          Set this to true to use the bean cache.
 Query<T> setUseQueryCache(boolean useQueryCache)
          Set this to true to use the query cache.
 Query<T> setVanillaMode(boolean vanillaMode)
          Set this to true and the beans and collections returned will be plain classes rather than Ebean generated dynamic subclasses etc.
 ExpressionList<T> where()
          Add Expressions to the where clause with the ability to chain on the ExpressionList.
 Query<T> where(Expression expression)
          Add a single Expression to the where clause returning the query.
 Query<T> where(String addToWhereClause)
          Add additional clause(s) to the where clause.
 

Method Detail

getType

Query.Type getType()
Return the type of query (List, Set, Map, Bean, rowCount etc).


getRawSql

RawSql getRawSql()
Return the RawSql that was set to use for this query.


setRawSql

Query<T> setRawSql(RawSql rawSql)
Set RawSql to use for this query.


cancel

void cancel()
Cancel the query execution if supported by the underlying database and driver.

This must be called from a different thread to the query executor.


getExpressionFactory

ExpressionFactory getExpressionFactory()
Return the ExpressionFactory used by this query.


isAutofetchTuned

boolean isAutofetchTuned()
Returns true if this query was tuned by autoFetch.


setAutofetch

Query<T> setAutofetch(boolean autofetch)
Explicitly specify whether to use Autofetch for this query.

If you do not call this method on a query the "Implicit Autofetch mode" is used to determine if Autofetch should be used for a given query.

Autofetch can add additional fetch paths to the query and specify which properties are included for each path. If you have explicitly defined some fetch paths Autofetch will not remove.


setQuery

Query<T> setQuery(String oql)
Deprecated. 

Deprecated in favour of EbeanServer.createQuery(Class, String).

Set the query using the query language.


select

Query<T> select(String fetchProperties)
Explicitly set a comma delimited list of the properties to fetch on the 'main' entity bean (aka partial object). Note that '*' means all properties.
 Query<Customer> query = Ebean.createQuery(Customer.class);
 
 // Only fetch the customer id, name and status.
 // This is described as a "Partial Object"
 query.select("name, status");
 query.where("lower(name) like :custname").setParameter("custname", "rob%");
 
 List<Customer> customerList = query.findList();
 

Parameters:
fetchProperties - the properties to fetch for this bean (* = all properties).

fetch

Query<T> fetch(String path,
               String fetchProperties)
Specify a path to fetch with its specific properties to include (aka partial object).

When you specify a join this means that property (associated bean(s)) will be fetched and populated. If you specify "*" then all the properties of the associated bean will be fetched and populated. You can specify a comma delimited list of the properties of that associated bean which means that only those properties are fetched and populated resulting in a "Partial Object" - a bean that only has some of its properties populated.

 // query orders...
 Query<Order> query = Ebean.createQuery(Order.class);
 
 // fetch the customer... 
 // ... getting the customer's name and phone number
 query.fetch("customer", "name, phNumber");
 
 // ... also fetch the customers billing address (* = all properties)
 query.fetch("customer.billingAddress", "*");
 

If columns is null or "*" then all columns/properties for that path are fetched.

 // fetch customers (their id, name and status)
 Query<Customer> query = Ebean.createQuery(Customer.class);
 
 // only fetch some of the properties of the customers
 query.select("name, status");
 List<Customer> list = query.findList();
 

Parameters:
path - the path of an associated (1-1,1-M,M-1,M-M) bean.
fetchProperties - properties of the associated bean that you want to include in the fetch (* means all properties, null also means all properties).

join

Query<T> join(String assocProperty,
              String fetchProperties)
Same as fetch(String, String).

This will eventually be deprecated in favour of the matching "fetch" method.


fetch

Query<T> fetch(String assocProperty,
               String fetchProperties,
               FetchConfig fetchConfig)
Additionally specify a FetchConfig to use a separate query or lazy loading to load this path.


join

Query<T> join(String assocProperty,
              String fetchProperties,
              JoinConfig joinConfig)
Additionally specify a JoinConfig to specify a "query join" and or define the lazy loading query.

This will eventually be deprecated in favour of the matching "fetch" method.


fetch

Query<T> fetch(String path)
Specify a path to load including all its properties.

The same as fetch(String, String) with the fetchProperties as "*".

Parameters:
path - the property of an associated (1-1,1-M,M-1,M-M) bean.

join

Query<T> join(String path)
Same as fetch(String)

This will eventually be deprecated in favour of the matching "fetch" method.


fetch

Query<T> fetch(String path,
               FetchConfig joinConfig)
Additionally specify a JoinConfig to specify a "query join" and or define the lazy loading query.


join

Query<T> join(String path,
              JoinConfig joinConfig)
Same as fetch(String, FetchConfig)

This will eventually be deprecated in favour of the matching "fetch" method.


findIds

List<Object> findIds()
Execute the query returning the list of Id's.

This query will execute against the EbeanServer that was used to create it.

See Also:
EbeanServer.findIds(Query, Transaction)

findList

List<T> findList()
Execute the query returning the list of objects.

This query will execute against the EbeanServer that was used to create it.

See Also:
EbeanServer.findList(Query, Transaction)

findSet

Set<T> findSet()
Execute the query returning the set of objects.

This query will execute against the EbeanServer that was used to create it.

See Also:
EbeanServer.findSet(Query, Transaction)

findMap

Map<?,T> findMap()
Execute the query returning a map of the objects.

This query will execute against the EbeanServer that was used to create it.

You can use setMapKey() so specify the property values to be used as keys on the map. If one is not specified then the id property is used.

 Query<Product> query = Ebean.createQuery(Product.class);
 query.setMapKey("sku");
 Map<?, Product> map = query.findMap();
 

See Also:
EbeanServer.findMap(Query, Transaction)

findUnique

T findUnique()
Execute the query returning either a single bean or null (if no matching bean is found).

If more than 1 row is found for this query then a PersistenceException is thrown.

This is useful when your predicates dictate that your query should only return 0 or 1 results.

 // assuming the sku of products is unique...
 Product product =
     Ebean.find(Product.class)
         .where("sku = ?")
         .set(1, "aa113")
         .findUnique();
 ...
 

It is also useful with finding objects by their id when you want to specify further join information.

 // Fetch order 1 and additionally fetch join its order details...
 Order order = 
     Ebean.find(Order.class)
       .setId(1)
       .fetch("details")
       .findUnique();
       
 List<OrderDetail> details = order.getDetails();
 ...
 


findRowCount

int findRowCount()
Return the count of entities this query should return.

This is the number of 'top level' or 'root level' entities.


findFutureRowCount

FutureRowCount<T> findFutureRowCount()
Execute find row count query in a background thread.

This returns a Future object which can be used to cancel, check the execution status (isDone etc) and get the value (with or without a timeout).

Returns:
a Future object for the row count query

findFutureIds

FutureIds<T> findFutureIds()
Execute find Id's query in a background thread.

This returns a Future object which can be used to cancel, check the execution status (isDone etc) and get the value (with or without a timeout).

Returns:
a Future object for the list of Id's

findFutureList

FutureList<T> findFutureList()
Execute find list query in a background thread.

This returns a Future object which can be used to cancel, check the execution status (isDone etc) and get the value (with or without a timeout).

Returns:
a Future object for the list result of the query

findPagingList

PagingList<T> findPagingList(int pageSize)
Return a PagingList for this query.

This can be used to break up a query into multiple queries to fetch the data a page at a time.

This typically works by using a query per page and setting setFirstRow(int) and and setMaxRows(int) on the query. This usually would translate into SQL that uses limit offset, rownum or row_number function to limit the result set.

Parameters:
pageSize - the number of beans fetched per Page

setParameter

Query<T> setParameter(String name,
                      Object value)
Set a named bind parameter. Named parameters have a colon to prefix the name.
 // a query with a named parameter
 String oql = "find order where status = :orderStatus";
 
 Query<Order> query = Ebean.createQuery(Order.class, oql);
 
 // bind the named parameter
 query.bind("orderStatus", OrderStatus.NEW);
 List<Order> list = query.findList();
 

Parameters:
name - the parameter name
value - the parameter value

setParameter

Query<T> setParameter(int position,
                      Object value)
Set an ordered bind parameter according to its position. Note that the position starts at 1 to be consistent with JDBC PreparedStatement. You need to set a parameter value for each ? you have in the query.
 // a query with a positioned parameter
 String oql = "where status = ? order by id desc";
 
 Query<Order> query = Ebean.createQuery(Order.class, oql);
 
 // bind the parameter
 query.setParameter(1, OrderStatus.NEW);
 
 List<Order> list = query.findList();
 

Parameters:
position - the parameter bind position starting from 1 (not 0)
value - the parameter bind value.

setListener

Query<T> setListener(QueryListener<T> queryListener)
Set a listener to process the query on a row by row basis.

Use this when you want to process a large query and do not want to hold the entire query result in memory.

It this case the rows are not loaded into the persistence context and instead are processed by the query listener.

 QueryListener<Order> listener = ...;
   
 Query<Order> query  = Ebean.createQuery(Order.class);
   
 // set the listener that will process each order one at a time
 query.setListener(listener);
   
 // execute the query. Note that the returned
 // list (emptyList) will be empty ...
 List<Order> emtyList = query.findList();
 


setId

Query<T> setId(Object id)
Set the Id value to query. This is used with findUnique().

You can use this to have further control over the query. For example adding fetch joins.

 Query<Order> query = Ebean.createQuery(Order.class);
 Order order = query.setId(1).join("details").findUnique();
 List<OrderDetail> details = order.getDetails();
 ...
 


where

Query<T> where(String addToWhereClause)
Add additional clause(s) to the where clause.

This typically contains named parameters which will need to be set via setParameter(String, Object).

 Query<Order> query = Ebean.createQuery(Order.class, "top");
 ...
 if (...) {
   query.where("status = :status and lower(customer.name) like :custName");
   query.setParameter("status", Order.NEW);
   query.setParameter("custName", "rob%");
 }
 

Internally the addToWhereClause string is processed by removing named parameters (replacing them with ?) and by converting logical property names to database column names (with table alias). The rest of the string is left as is and it is completely acceptable and expected for the addToWhereClause string to include sql functions and columns.

Parameters:
addToWhereClause - the clause to append to the where clause which typically contains named parameters.
Returns:
The query object

where

Query<T> where(Expression expression)
Add a single Expression to the where clause returning the query.
 List<Order> newOrders = 
     Ebean.find(Order.class)
                .where().eq("status", Order.NEW)
                .findList();
 ...
 


where

ExpressionList<T> where()
Add Expressions to the where clause with the ability to chain on the ExpressionList. You can use this for adding multiple expressions to the where clause.
 Query<Order> query = Ebean.createQuery(Order.class, "top");
 ...
 if (...) {
   query.where()
     .eq("status", Order.NEW)
     .ilike("customer.name","rob%");
 }
 

Returns:
The ExpressionList for adding expressions to.
See Also:
Expr

filterMany

ExpressionList<T> filterMany(String propertyName)
This applies a filter on the 'many' property list rather than the root level objects.

Typically you will use this in a scenario where the cardinality is high on the 'many' property you wish to join to. Say you want to fetch customers and their associated orders... but instead of getting all the orders for each customer you only want to get the new orders they placed since last week. In this case you can use filterMany() to filter the orders.

 
 List<Customer> list = Ebean.find(Customer.class)
   // .fetch("orders", new FetchConfig().lazy())
   // .fetch("orders", new FetchConfig().query())
   .fetch("orders")
   .where().ilike("name", "rob%")
   .filterMany("orders")
       .eq("status", Order.Status.NEW)
       .gt("orderDate", lastWeek)
   .findList();
 
 

Please note you have to be careful that you add expressions to the correct expression list - as there is one for the 'root level' and one for each filterMany that you have.

Parameters:
propertyName - the name of the many property that you want to have a filter on.
Returns:
the expression list that you add filter expressions for the many to.

having

ExpressionList<T> having()
Add Expressions to the Having clause return the ExpressionList.

Currently only beans based on raw sql will use the having clause.

Note that this returns the ExpressionList (so you can add multiple expressions to the query in a fluent API way).

Returns:
The ExpressionList for adding more expressions to.
See Also:
Expr

having

Query<T> having(String addToHavingClause)
Add additional clause(s) to the having clause.

This typically contains named parameters which will need to be set via setParameter(String, Object).

 Query<ReportOrder> query = Ebean.createQuery(ReportOrder.class);
 ...
 if (...) {
   query.having("score > :min");
   query.setParameter("min", 1);
 }
 

Parameters:
addToHavingClause - the clause to append to the having clause which typically contains named parameters.
Returns:
The query object

having

Query<T> having(Expression addExpressionToHaving)
Add an expression to the having clause returning the query.

Currently only beans based on raw sql will use the having clause.

This is similar to having() except it returns the query rather than the ExpressionList. This is useful when you want to further specify something on the query.

Parameters:
addExpressionToHaving - the expression to add to the having clause.
Returns:
the Query object

orderBy

Query<T> orderBy(String orderByClause)
Set the order by clause replacing the existing order by clause if there is one.

This follows SQL syntax using commas between each property with the optional asc and desc keywords representing ascending and descending order respectively.

This is EXACTLY the same as order(String).


order

Query<T> order(String orderByClause)
Set the order by clause replacing the existing order by clause if there is one.

This follows SQL syntax using commas between each property with the optional asc and desc keywords representing ascending and descending order respectively.

This is EXACTLY the same as orderBy(String).


order

OrderBy<T> order()
Return the OrderBy so that you can append an ascending or descending property to the order by clause.

This will never return a null. If no order by clause exists then an 'empty' OrderBy object is returned.

This is EXACTLY the same as orderBy().


orderBy

OrderBy<T> orderBy()
Return the OrderBy so that you can append an ascending or descending property to the order by clause.

This will never return a null. If no order by clause exists then an 'empty' OrderBy object is returned.

This is EXACTLY the same as order().


setOrder

Query<T> setOrder(OrderBy<T> orderBy)
Set an OrderBy object to replace any existing OrderBy clause.

This is EXACTLY the same as setOrderBy(OrderBy).


setOrderBy

Query<T> setOrderBy(OrderBy<T> orderBy)
Set an OrderBy object to replace any existing OrderBy clause.

This is EXACTLY the same as setOrder(OrderBy).


setDistinct

Query<T> setDistinct(boolean isDistinct)
Set whether this query uses DISTINCT.


setVanillaMode

Query<T> setVanillaMode(boolean vanillaMode)
Set this to true and the beans and collections returned will be plain classes rather than Ebean generated dynamic subclasses etc.

This is *ONLY* relevant when you are not using enhancement (and using dynamic subclasses instead).

Alternatively you can globally set the mode using ebean.vanillaMode=true in ebean.properties or ServerConfig.setVanillaMode(boolean).

See Also:
ServerConfig.setVanillaMode(boolean), ServerConfig.setVanillaRefMode(boolean)

getFirstRow

int getFirstRow()
Return the first row value.


setFirstRow

Query<T> setFirstRow(int firstRow)
Set the first row to return for this query.

Parameters:
firstRow -

getMaxRows

int getMaxRows()
Return the max rows for this query.


setMaxRows

Query<T> setMaxRows(int maxRows)
Set the maximum number of rows to return in the query.

Parameters:
maxRows - the maximum number of rows to return in the query.

setBackgroundFetchAfter

Query<T> setBackgroundFetchAfter(int backgroundFetchAfter)
Set the rows after which fetching should continue in a background thread.

Parameters:
backgroundFetchAfter -

setMapKey

Query<T> setMapKey(String mapKey)
Set the property to use as keys for a map.

If no property is set then the id property is used.

 // Assuming sku is unique for products...
    
 Query<Product> query = Ebean.createQuery(Product.class);
   
 // use sku for keys...
 query.setMapKey("sku");
   
 Map<?,Product> productMap = query.findMap();
 ...
 

Parameters:
mapKey - the property to use as keys for a map.

setUseCache

Query<T> setUseCache(boolean useBeanCache)
Set this to true to use the bean cache.

If the query result is in cache then by default this same instance is returned. In this sense it should be treated as a read only object graph.


setUseQueryCache

Query<T> setUseQueryCache(boolean useQueryCache)
Set this to true to use the query cache.


setReadOnly

Query<T> setReadOnly(boolean readOnly)
When set to true when you want the returned beans to be read only.


setLoadBeanCache

Query<T> setLoadBeanCache(boolean loadBeanCache)
When set to true all the beans from this query are loaded into the bean cache.


setTimeout

Query<T> setTimeout(int secs)
Set a timeout on this query.

This will typically result in a call to setQueryTimeout() on a preparedStatement. If the timeout occurs an exception will be thrown - this will be a SQLException wrapped up in a PersistenceException.

Parameters:
secs - the query timeout limit in seconds. Zero means there is no limit.

setBufferFetchSizeHint

Query<T> setBufferFetchSizeHint(int fetchSize)
A hint which for JDBC translates to the Statement.fetchSize().

Gives the JDBC driver a hint as to the number of rows that should be fetched from the database when more rows are needed for ResultSet.


getGeneratedSql

String getGeneratedSql()
Return the sql that was generated for executing this query.

This is only available after the query has been executed and provided only for informational purposes.



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